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[SOLVED] Rekordbox 2.0.1 Key Analysis vs. Mixed In Key

So, I've downloaded the new update for Rekordbox.  I have been using Mixed In Key for many years now, so most of my music is tagged with Camelot notation.

Just tried analyzing some tracks with Rekordbox, and I noticed that the key detected by Rekordbox is not always the same as MiK.

 

Who should I trust?

Fuse Promote

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I also would like to know that :)  If someone can .. please test it

TheOne 0 votes
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I have not yet played with RB's key detection, but MIK has been around for years and using advanced algorithm, it always worked great for me. What kind of notation does RB use?

kooba 0 votes
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This isn't really a fair argument. If you analyse 10 tracks and 5 give different results does this mean MiK is 50% better or worse?

If anyone is really serious about doing this it should be rekordbox vs MiK vs your ears.

Gavin 0 votes
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This isn't really an accurate or fair assessment of the situation. Rekordbox in my application of it, is just showing the Key that Beatport assigned it. Now, I would assume since the labels (in most cases) provide Beatport this information, it's the most accurate. But I do get discrepancies myself when I compare MIK and Rekordbox. It is confusing.

Matty Scoll 0 votes
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I was thinking of purchasing MIK until I saw the feature was in RB. I notice the representation of keys is different from that in MIK. Is there a Pioneer chart like the wheel notation in MIK?

Colesy 0 votes
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I think the below is more what I was after which I found in another thread on here. The table below (if I read it correctly) allows you to analyse the keys in RB and then convert them to MIK notation

 

A = 11B

Ab = 4B

Am = 8A

 

B = 1B

Bb = 6B

Bbm = 3A

Bm = 10A

 

C = 8B                                    

C#m = 12A                                      

 Cm = 5A                                    

 

D = 10B

Db = 3B

Dm = 7A

 

E = 12B

Eb = 5B

Ebm = 2A

Em = 9A

 

F = 7B

F#m = 11A

Fm = 4A

 

G = 9B

G#m = 1A

Gb = 2B

Gm = 6A

Colesy 0 votes
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I find that the Key Detection in Rekordbox is excellent, and largely negates the need to pay for Mixed In Key.

I prefer to use both Camelot and Standard Notation in my Rekordbox Tags.  I do this by using Standard in the Key Field, and Camelot in the Comments.

Also, I would suggest you always use 2 digits in your Camelot numbers.  For example,  4A should be 04A.  5A should be 05A.  11A = 11A.    The reason for doing this is because Rekordbox can sort by Comments field and by using a leading zero the Camelot numbers will alphabetize in correct order.

Fuse Promote 0 votes
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Good tip Fuse I use that alot in naming files in compilations on my actual hard drive to maintain order.

I'm only really just moving a few bits over to Rekordbox (bored of waiting for HID support in Serato for my Nexus) so I am going to use the key analysis in RB for now rather then shell out on MIK.

Colesy 0 votes
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I am just getting round to using the RekordBox/MIK conversion table posted earlier in the thread however there are a few RekordBox Keys that I don't have a MIK equivalent of does anyone know what they are? The Rekordbox keys are:

 

Abm

Dbm

F#

Colesy 0 votes
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@Colesy > I'll likely create a video on this topic as it would be easier to explain but to quickly answer your question:

Abm is A flat minor. A flat is the same as G sharp. Therefore Abm = G#m

Dbm is D flat minor. D flat is the same as C sharp. Therefore Dbm = C#m

F# is F sharp major. F sharp is the same as G flat. Therefore F# = Gb

Gavin 0 votes
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