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Signal Path and Optimal Recording Levels Questions

Hi, I have two questions about recording DJ mixes into Logic using my Pioneer equipment.

Here's my setup info: I'm using two CDJ-2000s, a DJM-900 Nexus, rekordbox and the DJM-900 Nexus utility to record DJ mixes into Logic. My source files are 320kbps/44.1k mp3 files on my Mac Pro's iTunes Library (my iTunes Library is kept on a separate internal hard drive in my Mac Pro, not on the boot drive). I'm using a Pro DJ Link with a Netgear FS105 Fast Ethernet Switch, and have the computer hooked up to this LAN with an ethernet cable. The digital outs of the CDJs are going into the digital ins of the DJM. And a USB cable is connected from the DJM to the computer.

So, question #1: what is the exact signal path and what conversions are taking place? Am I correct in understanding that the digital audio is going from the USB out of the computer to the mixer, then through the LAN to the CDJs, then from the digital outs of the CDJs to the mixer, then from the DJM's USB out to the computer?  And, does the ethernet cable that's connected to the computer carry simply the rekordbox library information? If all of this is true, then does the information stay purely digital with no conversions until it is fed into Logic?

The reason I'm asking all of this leads to my second question. If I'm correct in assuming that the signal is never being converted to analog, and I'm using mp3s, would that affect the optimal signal level for the audio files I'm recording into Logic? I'm recording at 24bit/44.1k for my Logic DJ mix, and know that usually, a maximum signal level of -6db is recommended for Logic, so as to allow headroom and avoid inter-sample clipping. But since the source file is an mp3 which is already heavily compressed, would the recommended signal level change?

Sorry this is kind of a long question! But thanks for any input.

Tim Robert

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